Elevate your historical video game or wargame and engage your players with an experience that balances history and gameplay. At Epoch Xperience, our researchers work closely with your development team to fine-tune historical details, help create a fitting narrative, and build rich, vibrant worlds ripped straight from the history books. From pre- to post-production, we’ll be at your side, guiding development and marketing to ensure your historical game is entertaining, immersive, and budding with historical details and facts. Our goal isn’t to bore your players, but to thrust them into a living, breathing world blended with historical details and fantastical lore.
Black Friday is the biggest shopping day of the year, with many shoppers waiting for this day to do the majority of their seasonal shopping thanks to the countless deals available at most retailers. Stores like Walmart, Target, Best Buy, and Amazon tend to carry some excellent discounts, ranging from household electronics to video games.  To help lay out a plan of where you should be shopping for your historical gaming deals, we’ve picked out some of the very best Black Friday deals that you’ll find. These games would make perfect gifts for any big history buffs in your family, or could simply just be a great purchase if you happen to love games and history alike. Best Buy Assassin’s Creed Valhalla (PS4/Xbox One) – $19.99 The latest installment in the blockbuster Assassin’s Creed franchise has been heavily discounted by pretty much every major retailer for Black Friday. However, Best Buy is selling it for the lowest price of all — just $19.99. If you’re a fan of the Viking age or have any interest in this series, then this is a solid deal.  Red Dead Redemption 2 (PS4/Xbox One) – $24.99 Red Dead Redemption 2 was released several years ago but has managed to retain its value fairly well. Discounted down to $24.99 by Best Buy, this is the lowest that we’ve seen it on sale for. Set during the Wild West, Red Dead 2 is a ton of fun for anybody who’s ever dreamed of being a badass cowboy. This game is also packed with tons of content, so it should keep you busy for quite a while. Walmart Call of Duty Black Ops Cold War (PS4/Xbox One) – $39 Though Vanguard may have already released, last year’s Call of Duty Black Ops Cold War is another solid...
Thanks to online digital services like the PlayStation Network, the Nintendo Eshop, the Xbox Game Store, and the Steam Store, it’s easier than ever for gamers to get ahold of all the latest games. Compared to when all games were physical, more games than ever are sold on these various platforms and can be conveniently accessed through an internet connection. This is great as it both allows developers to release their games to a wider crowd and gives gamers a chance to purchase more games than ever before possible. However, there are some drawbacks to this. One of the biggest possibilities is a game being removed from a digital platform due to a loss of rights. Classic games like Scott Pilgrim Vs. The World and The Simpsons Arcade Game were both removed due to publishers losing licensing rights, with the latter yet to be re-released. But historical video games, in particular, have a uniquelayer of licensing to be concerned about, particularly if archival footage was used in game. An oversight by a developer or a time-sensitive license could very well affect the future of the game – which Konami recently discovered when forced to pull copies of one of its most popular titles from the Internet indefinitely. Lost to History It’s unfortunate to see games removed from digital storefronts, as it deprives gamers of experiencing them. The most recent example of this came with the removal of several Metal Gear Solid games from various storefronts.  Earlier this month, Konami removed Metal Gear Solid 2: Sons of Liberty and Metal Gear Solid 3: Snake Eater from its respective storefronts, because both titles featured various historical archival footage in several cutscenes. The licensed footage, taken from Cold War archives, apparently expired without getting renewed. And while Konami did mention in its statement...
Over the past five years, Twitch has grown to be the largest streaming platform in the world with 140 million monthly active users. The website has been an excellent platform for users to meet and connect with others all over the world and watch their favorite streamers play new and popular games. It has also been a great place for players to discover lesser-known indie titles. While more popular streamers tend to mostly play the latest and greatest AAA games, smaller streamers have found ways to gain attention by focusing on specific niches, such as streamers who exclusively play retro games, horror games, etc. But out of the millions of streamers on the platform, very few of them have focused primarily on historical games. This comes as somewhat of a surprise, as the historical video game genre is a large one and a Twitch channel entirely devoted to historically-based games seems like a no-brainer. A Large Catalog of Games If a streamer were to solely focus on historical games, they certainly would have no problem with finding games to play for viewers. From old classic titles like Civilization and Age of Empires to recent releases like Crusader Kings III and Going Medieval, there is certainly no shortage of historically-based games with a large player base. Heck, even some of the most popular game franchises of all time like Call of Duty and Battlefield feature titles that have historical merit. That’s not even to mention the Assassin’s Creed series, which is arguably one of the biggest and most influential game franchises of all time. The series has enough games to sustain an entire streamer’s channel all on its own. Equal Parts Educational and Entertaining A Twitch channel devoted to historically-based games would not only entertain users but could also help to...
Mobile gaming has exploded in popularity over the last decade, with more than 2.2 billion mobile gamers worldwide as of 2021. In a recent study, it was found that smartphones accounted for almost 50 percent of video game revenue worldwide, with mobile game revenue looking to surpass the 100 billion dollar mark by 2023. And with so much money to be made, it’s no wonder developers are jumping onto the once-loathed platform. Major gaming publishers have begun bringing their titles to mobile devices, from Nintendo’s Mario Kart to Krafton’s PUBG getting their own exclusive entries for mobile. In some cases, the mobile versions of these popular PC and console games have proved to be just as profitable if not more so. With more games coming to mobile, we’d be curious to see if historically-based games will be able to make the transition just as successfully; and if they do, will they be able to keep their historical authenticity intact for small screens? Ports of PC and Console Versions Many video games with historical merit have already been ported to mobile devices, including the likes of Sid Meir’s Civilization VI, Rome: Total War, and Company of Heroes. While these games don’t really lose any of their historical value because they’re mere ports, however, they do seem to lose something when ported to the small screen. Mobile titles are appealing to most crowds because of their accessibility and simplicity, and ports of massive RTS games made for Windows and Mac are anything but that. To add salt to the wound, the mobile port of Civilization VI even launched at its full price for other systems — a whopping $60. Yikes. These games are clearly still great, but they don’t feel at home on mobile devices — and historical video game developers should...
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